Joie de Vivre jewelry
••  p u r p l e

Purple is an interesting color from both the artistic and scientific perspective. Purple is the color of royalty, creativity and mystery. Spring violets wake us from winter and summer lilacs make us wish the evenings would never end. Purple is the only secondary color that is the product of the same two primary colors (red, blue) regardless of whether one is mixing light (as for graphical display) or pigment. Another interesting fact about purple: technically, it doesn't have a wavelength range since by definition it is a composite color from blue and red, at opposite ends of the spectrum.

Although many stones appear purple, few are naturally so. Amethyst is the most common and popular naturally occurring purple gemstone. Fluorite can show beautiful deep shades of purple, and sugilite is also a deep purple, but not common. Kunzite can show lavender shades, though it is more commonly pink. Amethyst also can be lavender. Ametrine is a graduated stone of citrine and amethyst that shows pale lavender and yellow shades.

Swarovski crystal colors "light amethyst", "amethyst" and "purple velvet" are are light, medium and dark purple shades.

Purple dyed pearls are available, though it's difficult to find a shade that doesn't look like a cheap facsimile of a Tahitian pearl. Deep purple is a popular and effective stain for wood, often deepening the color and enhancing the grain.

•• d e s i g n s   f e a t u r i n g   p u r p l e

Forget Me Not
Hypotrochoid #5
Ametrine No. 7 Carnarvon
Lady in Waiting
Bovary Lite
Fluorite No. 3 Bovary
Dreaming
Doe
Atalanta
Victorian
Gem Drops (S3)
Harvest
Sangria
Seasonal
Daydream

••  c o l o r   l i n k s

yellow | yellow green | green | blue green | blue | blue purple | purple | red purple | red | orange red | orange | yellow orange | neutral light | neutral dark |